Study concludes that Modafinil may be an effective treatment for cocaine dependence

A recent study has confirmed previous trials which indicate that Modafinil may be an effective treatment for cocaine dependence.

The paper is entitled: “A double blind, placebo controlled trial of modafinil for the treatment of cocaine dependence without co-morbid alcohol dependence.”

This study was authored by seven medical experts from the Perelman School of Medicine at University of Pennsylvania. They came from the Department of Psychiatry, Department of Medicine and the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics. (1)

It was found that modafinil helped those using it to not use cocaine and lowered their cravings. This backs up previous laboratory trials which demonstrated that modafinil use in cocaine dependent people reduced their cocaine usage and reduced the negative effects of cocaine.

The authors concluded that  “Modafinil may be an efficacious treatment for cocaine dependence.”

Highlights:
• This was a double blind placebo controlled trial of modafinil for cocaine dependence.
• It involved 94 subjects treated with 300 mg of modafinil or placebo daily for 8 weeks.
• Modafinil treated subjects were more likely to achieve cocaine abstinence.
• Modafinil treated subjects were more likely to report very low levels of cocaine craving.
• Modafinil treated subjects were more likely to rate themselves very much improved.

Abstract:
Background

Modafinil is a medication approved for narcolepsy and shift work sleep disorder. It has both dopaminergic and glutamatergic activity that could be useful for the treatment of cocaine dependence. Modafinil has reduced cocaine subjective effects and cocaine self-administration in human laboratory trials and has reduced cocaine use in cocaine dependent patients in some clinical trials.

Methods:

This was an 8-week, double blind, placebo controlled clinical trial involving 94 cocaine dependent subjects. Subjects received 300 mg of modafinil or identical placebo daily along with weekly individual therapy. The primary outcome measure was cocaine use measured by self-report, and confirmed by twice weekly urine benzoylecgonine tests (UBT). Additional outcome measures included cocaine craving measured by the Brief Substance Craving Scale and global improvement measured by the Clinical Global Impression Scale (CGI).

Results:

The odds ratio (OR) in favor of abstinence for modafinil vs. placebo was 2.54 (p = . 03) and modafinil-treated subjects were significantly more likely than placebo-treated subjects to be abstinent from cocaine during the last 3 weeks of the trial, 23% vs. 9%, χ2 = 3.9, p < .05. Modafinil treated subjects were more likely to report very low levels of cocaine craving intensity and duration on the Brief Substance Craving Scale (OR = 2.04, p = .03 and OR 1.06, p = .03 respectively). Modafinil-treated subjects were also more likely than placebo-treated subjects to rate themselves as “very much improved” on the CGI (OR = 2.69, p = .03).

Conclusion:

Modafinil may be an efficacious treatment for cocaine dependence

Read the full study here:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0376871615015963

(1)

(Kyle M. Kampmana, Kevin G. Lyncha, Helen M. Pettinatia, Kelly Sprattb, Michael R. Wierzbickic, Charles Dackisa, Charles P. O’Briena
a Department of Psychiatry, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3900 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
b Department of Medicine, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA
c Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics, Perelman School of Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, 3400 Spruce Street, Philadelphia, PA 19104, USA)